How To Know You’re a Social Media Junkie

So much of our time is spent on various forms of online communication.

Personally, I find my feed to be amusing enough to spend several hours of my day perusing, viewing, and commenting. Unwittingly, this makes us reliant on social media. Most of the time, we allow social media to influence our behavior, mindset, and self-esteem.

Do you really doubt that? Let me explain to you how to identify as a social media junkie.

You have an obsession with likes

Likes on social networking sites are now both a symbol of approbation and a form of virtual cash. The goal of most content-sharing users is to get positive feedback from their followers. Thus, we attribute to them a high level of attractiveness and assume they are well-liked by others and have the same views as ourselves. The bigger the number of likes, the happier the blogger and the more likely they are to publish again.

The issue occurs when the level of interaction beneath a post is used to form an opinion on the post itself. Users have been caught deleting postings after receiving few or no likes in numerous online communities.

Comparing yourself to others

Considering how much time we spend in front of screens, it’s no surprise that we tend to apply the things we see there to our own lives. As long as there have been people, there have been some who look at the successes of others and question what they’re doing wrong.

The stuff we have seen on social media is frequently just the highlight reel, a curated version of what really exists. Rarely do we share selfies of ourselves while we’re sick or making a simple yet tasty lunch. By only relaying information that we personally find advantageous, we alter others’ perceptions of the world.

Watching too many profiles

Because of the importance of being informed, we seek out as many credible knowledge and content providers as possible. To get a more complete picture, we’ve begun keeping tabs on a wider range of public figures, whether they are members of the media, influential consumers, or prominent companies. This method may make it seem as if we are getting additional resources. However, the time spent perusing them rises, which may lead to procrastination and disregard for interpersonal responsibilities.

Long-term, this might potentially alter how often and how well you sleep. We check our phones and social media application alerts first thing in the morning and last thing at night.

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